The next few months are critical for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s presidential prospects — mainly because most Americans still know almost nothing about him.


Dan Balz of The Washington Post FRAMES the matter thusly:


Today he is touted in the media and Republican circles as a serious long-distance runner in the presidential marathon.


At the same time, for all the attention his clashes with public employee unions have generated, he remains a politician barely known to the public at large. A recent series of Quinnipiac University polls in Colorado, Iowa and Virginia found that Walker had “the lowest name recognition” of any candidates tested.


That means most Americans will begin to form their impressions of Walker over the coming months — and why each small moment of exposure has the potential for exaggerated impact on his political future.


As one who’s followed Walker’s political adventures in Wisconsin more closely than most Americans, I’m not so sure that he won’t stumble badly in the national spotlight. That’s what happened two years ago to another Republican governor, Rick Perry of Texas.


But if Walker avoids any big-time pratfalls, he’ll likely be a force to contend with.


The next few months are critical for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s presidential prospects — mainly because most Americans still know almost nothing about him.

Dan Balz of The Washington Post FRAMES the matter thusly:

Today he is touted in the media and Republican circles as a serious long-distance runner in the presidential marathon.

At the same time, for all the attention his clashes with public employee unions have generated, he remains a politician barely known to the public at large. A recent series of Quinnipiac University polls in Colorado, Iowa and Virginia found that Walker had “the lowest name recognition” of any candidates tested.

That means most Americans will begin to form their impressions of Walker over the coming months — and why each small moment of exposure has the potential for exaggerated impact on his political future.

As one who’s followed Walker’s political adventures in Wisconsin more closely than most Americans, I’m not so sure that he won’t stumble badly in the national spotlight. That’s what happened two years ago to another Republican governor, Rick Perry of Texas.

But if Walker avoids any big-time pratfalls, he’ll likely be a force to contend with.