Some people — not me, but certain folks of lesser political insights — seem to think that Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker actually has a chance of becoming president.


The main reason why Walker has no real prospects for moving into the White House is that…well, he’s just not very bright, even by Republican standards.


Take, for example, THIS SITUATION:


For over a century, the University of Wisconsin has committed itself to some simple principles, such as, “Basic to every purpose of the system is the search for truth.” Under Walker’s budget, those words would be deleted from the school’s stated mission, along with the university’s commitment “to educate people and improve the human condition” and “serve and stimulate society.”
 
All of this language would be replaced with a new phrase: the university, under the Walker’s administration’s vision, would focus on “the state’s work force needs.”

When even Republicans balked at the governor’s move, Walker’s office offered an explanation that the editorial board of the New York Times described as “ridiculous.”


The citizens of Wisconsin, clearly more appreciative of the state university than is their governor, erupted through social media and news outlets, sending Mr. Walker into retreat a day later. His office attempted the ridiculous excuse that the pernicious editing of the university’s mission was simply “a drafting error” in the budget text and that the Wisconsin Idea would be left intact after all. But a December email showed clear instructions from the administration to make the deletions.


 

Some people — not me, but certain folks of lesser political insights — seem to think that Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker actually has a chance of becoming president.

The main reason why Walker has no real prospects for moving into the White House is that…well, he’s just not very bright, even by Republican standards.

Take, for example, THIS SITUATION:

For over a century, the University of Wisconsin has committed itself to some simple principles, such as, “Basic to every purpose of the system is the search for truth.” Under Walker’s budget, those words would be deleted from the school’s stated mission, along with the university’s commitment “to educate people and improve the human condition” and “serve and stimulate society.”   All of this language would be replaced with a new phrase: the university, under the Walker’s administration’s vision, would focus on “the state’s work force needs.” When even Republicans balked at the governor’s move, Walker’s office offered an explanation that the editorial board of the New York Times described as “ridiculous.” The citizens of Wisconsin, clearly more appreciative of the state university than is their governor, erupted through social media and news outlets, sending Mr. Walker into retreat a day later. His office attempted the ridiculous excuse that the pernicious editing of the university’s mission was simply “a drafting error” in the budget text and that the Wisconsin Idea would be left intact after all. But a December email showed clear instructions from the administration to make the deletions.