Sinai Miller, a third-grader at Fox Hill Elementary School on the north side of Indianapolis, Indiana, tries to do things right. She earns A's and B's at school; helps her younger sisters with their home work and is outgoing and kind. So naturally the first thing Sinai (pronounced sih-NYE) wanted to know on the afternoon of February 3 was "what did I do wrong?"

She'd been waiting all day to get her hands on her Girl Scout cookies so she could start selling them door-to-door around her apartment complex. She talked about cookies when she woke up, and was still talking about them when she got home from school. After finishing her homework, she told her Mom it was 4:30 -- time to meet at the apartment clubhouse with the other girls to pick up cookies and start knocking on doors. But she never got there.

"What did I do wrong?"
Just as she took a few steps outside her apartment with one of her little sisters, the gunfire started. Her Mom, Shanita Miller, rushed out and pushed both girls back inside, and Sinai started yelling, "Mama, Mama, it hurt!" She'd been hit in the leg with a stray bullet. Luckily it missed bone and artery, and she was treated and released from the hospital to recover at home, but she can't sell any cookies.
To help, the Girl Scouts of Central Indiana, which has troops in 45 counties, created a Web page so Sinai can continue to meet her cookie goals while recuperating. Here's the link. http://www.girlscoutsindiana.org/cookies/cookiesforsinai
By visiting this site, you may purchase cookies from Sinai for yourself, or for Operation Cookie Drop, which gives free Girl Scout cookies to active duty and retired servicemen from central Indiana. And the good news? As of late Thursday, more than 2,000 boxes of cookies have been purchased in Sinai's name. She hopes the earnings will fund a trip for her troop. But on the first night home after being shot, she jumped out of her sleep at noises as common as her sister going to the bathroom, which proves that some wounds aren't fixed with a bandage. 

Sinai Miller, a third-grader at Fox Hill Elementary School on the north side of Indianapolis, Indiana, tries to do things right. She earns A's and B's at school; helps her younger sisters with their home work and is outgoing and kind. So naturally the first thing Sinai (pronounced sih-NYE) wanted to know on the afternoon of February 3 was "what did I do wrong?"

She'd been waiting all day to get her hands on her Girl Scout cookies so she could start selling them door-to-door around her apartment complex. She talked about cookies when she woke up, and was still talking about them when she got home from school. After finishing her homework, she told her Mom it was 4:30 -- time to meet at the apartment clubhouse with the other girls to pick up cookies and start knocking on doors. But she never got there.

"What did I do wrong?"
Just as she took a few steps outside her apartment with one of her little sisters, the gunfire started. Her Mom, Shanita Miller, rushed out and pushed both girls back inside, and Sinai started yelling, "Mama, Mama, it hurt!" She'd been hit in the leg with a stray bullet. Luckily it missed bone and artery, and she was treated and released from the hospital to recover at home, but she can't sell any cookies.
To help, the Girl Scouts of Central Indiana, which has troops in 45 counties, created a Web page so Sinai can continue to meet her cookie goals while recuperating. Here's the link. http://www.girlscoutsindiana.org/cookies/cookiesforsinai
By visiting this site, you may purchase cookies from Sinai for yourself, or for Operation Cookie Drop, which gives free Girl Scout cookies to active duty and retired servicemen from central Indiana. And the good news? As of late Thursday, more than 2,000 boxes of cookies have been purchased in Sinai's name. She hopes the earnings will fund a trip for her troop. But on the first night home after being shot, she jumped out of her sleep at noises as common as her sister going to the bathroom, which proves that some wounds aren't fixed with a bandage.