We’ve all had our share of White Christmases, but what about a White Halloween?


Snow can be a welcome change of scenery in December, but it is usually met with scowls as homeowners brush snow off of their Jack 0’Lanterns.


We’ve all had our share of White Christmases, but what about a White Halloween?

Snow can be a welcome change of scenery in December, but it is usually met with scowls as homeowners brush snow off of their Jack 0’Lanterns.

Tom Kinds of AccuWeather.com said this storm was “out of the ordinary” for this time of year and “has probably not happened before.”

This storm, the textbook classification of a Nor’easter, slammed everywhere between the Virginias to Maine.

A Nor’easter is a strong storm that develops as a result of strong areas of low pressure sweeping up the East Coast and out to sea. If the storm moves slightly east, as this storm system did, if accompanied by colder air the storm will bring with it snow instead of rain.

With the “cold air being in place mixing with a lot of precipitation” added up to “big snow accumulation for parts of the Northeast,” he said.

Kinds said that this storm was so powerful because it had the “perfect circumstances to develop.”

“Everything fell into place,” he added, to make the storm as strong as it was.

According to AccuWeather.com, about a foot of snow was dropped on northeastern Pennsylvania, parts of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

The heaviest accumulation of snow was found in Peru, Mass. at a whopping 32 inches.

This past weekend, Northeast Pennsylvania was hit with the first Nor’easter of the season. It has left thousands in Pennsylvania without power. As of yesterday, 34 people in Wayne County were out of power as a result of the Jack Frost’s early visit.

The power outages were likely caused by the heavy, dense snow hanging on leaf-bearing trees. The added weight of the snow on the leaves causes the branches to fall on roads and power lines.

Slick roads and black ice were also prevalent in the area on Saturday, causing travel to be hazardous. Driving conditions were made more dangerous by the heavy, constant falling of snow and the freezing temperatures.

According to PPL, “As of 8:30 a.m.  Monday (Oct. 31), power has been restored to about 189,500 customers affected by the storm.” Most of the residents still experiencing power outages are located in the Lehigh Valley region, with smaller instances of outages in other counties as well.

Kinds said that the power outages caused by the storm “should be over by now,” but that areas closer to and including Allentown are still struggling with outages.