“I just think if we can save one life, it’s well worth it.”

Susan Sadak of Honesdale knows the difference an automatic external defibrillator (AED) can make when someone’s having a heart attack or cardiac event.


“I just think if we can save one life, it’s well worth it.”


Susan Sadak of Honesdale knows the difference an automatic external defibrillator (AED) can make when someone’s having a heart attack or cardiac event. “I’ve seen the outcome of survival from an AED and early intervention,” said Sadak, an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Nurse at Wayne Memorial Hospital (WMH).


Sadak’s mom, Alberta Robbins of Honesdale, recently donated AEDs to the Central United Methodist Church in Honesdale where her family attends as well as Papa’s Primo Pizza on Main Street. Each unit runs about $1,500.


With tears in her eyes, Mrs. Robbins says she did it to make a difference. “Because my husband passed away from a cardiac arrest. If we could keep a family from going through what we went through, then these are all worth it. You never know when anyone may need it, whether in your family or someone else’s.” Robert Robbins passed away in 2001.


Describing her dad as “very outgoing, friendly and very people oriented,” Sadak said he’d be proud of their efforts, as proud as she is of her mom. “My mom’s been 40 plus years in healthcare, she was a nurse’s aide at Wayne Memorial Hospital. She’s retired now, but still does private duty. She’s always had the need of taking care of others,” Sadak said.


Robert Morcom, an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) with Honesdale EMS, held a two-hour training class Tuesday at Papa’s Primo Pizza, training employees on the proper use of the AED, along with other emergency care. “When someone goes into a cardiac arrest, it’s usually from ventricular fibrillation— the heart’s quivering,” Morcom said. He said the AED analyzes the heart rhythm and will advise you whether or not it needs a shock. “If they deliver the shock, it stops the heart and then the next signal coming down from the brain hopefully puts it back into a normal rhythm. The sooner that you can use this, the greater the chance of survival,” he said.


Mark Figura, owner of Papa’s Primo Pizza had high praises for the donation of the AED. “It doesn’t just help us here, it helps everybody on the block,” he said. “We would be able to respond while they’re waiting for the ambulance to get help.”


All of Figura’s employees took the two-hour training to be able to use the AED if needed. Though prepared, Figura said, “We hope we never have to use it.”