Thousands of residents and businesses were left without power in the wake of Winter Storm Riley, Friday, March 2nd, in Wayne, Pike and Monroe counties as well as in areas of New York State along the Upper Delaware.

WAYNE/PIKE – Thousands of residents and businesses were left without power in the wake of Winter Storm Riley, Friday, March 2nd, in Wayne, Pike and Monroe counties as well as in areas of New York State along the Upper Delaware.

PPL and other local power companies, joined by utility crews from other sections, worked around the clock. Some, however, were still without power at least through Wednesday. The impact of a second snow storm that arrived Wednesday, March 7, was expected to slow efforts and cause additional hardships.

As of Thursday, March 7, PPL was still reporting that there were 2,533 customers without power, six days after Winter Storm Riley. It was not clear how many may have been new reports of outages, caused by Quinn.

This was down considerably from Wednesday when PPL listed 6,479 still without power.

At the height of the March 2nd storm, about 20,000 had lost power.

Pike County Light & Power Company had about 3,000 customers out at the height; as of Wednesday, approximately 2,100 had electric restored. Some areas were not expected to be back on till Friday, a week after the March 2nd storm.
A question poised on The News Eagle Facebook page asked how people were coping without power. Here are several of their responses.

Shayla Alura said that her mother, in Palmyra Township, just outside Hawley, was managing with a wood stove but it was 35 degrees in the house Wednesday morning. Shayla’s brother and wife in Tinkwig also were still without power. They moved in with her parents, who have a generator.

There was still no power in Rowland Wednesday at Jess Lynn’s home. She said she heard it may be a week to get it back.

“Making the best of it,” said Mary Shannon Inglesby on Wednesday, in the dark near Tinkwig since Saturday. She was using propane and a stove for heat.

“Candles and oil lamps, flashlights for lights,” said Terri McConnell-Supinski of Lakeville, on Day Six since no power. They have a wood insert for heat.

Down in Dingmans Ferry on Tuesday, Jennifer Gill said they were still without power and heard from a power line crew that it could be “two weeks” before everyone had electric. “Keeping the fire going and lots of board games,” she said, adding that she wished the power companies would be up front and not give “false hopes” to weary residents.

The Milford home of Crystal Smith Kidd also had no lights. She said their generator was running the refrigerator and TV. A propane stove and wood stove added to their survival gear. “We are getting by,” she said.

Anita Periano said Tuesday that Cromwelltown was without power; a generator and fireplace were keeping them going.

Melanie Lynne, of Dingmans, was on Day Five. She expressed thanks to Hotel Fauchere for providing them hot showers and coffee.

“I’m dealing with it the best I can,” said Krystal Eldridge, who lives just outside Hawley. “Froze the first couple nights then got a propane heater. Everything from my refrigerator an freezer is outside buried in the snow. She said she was praying her power would be restored before the second storm.

Greentown resident Janet Lundgren Seifert was on Day Four in the dark. They were lugging water, using candles, a lantern and propane.

A generator was helping Jessica Zucchino Tejeda in the Dingmans Ferry area but noted this was costly.

Diane Luoni-Garrison, Dingman Township, was also relying on a generator but was having trouble getting the company to refill the tanks.
A PPL line crew truck passes through White Mills, PA on Route 6 Wednesday, during the send major snow storm in a week.
News Eagle photo by Peter Becker