The Wayne Highlands School Board has approved a "special education agreement" for $110,000 stemming from a complaint filed by a former student.

- The Wayne Highlands School Board has approved a "special education agreement" for $110,000 stemming from a complaint filed by a former student. The board voted unanimously at a special meeting Tuesday to take the action. The money will come out of the district's general fund, said Superintendent Greg Frigoletto. "The district is responsible," he said. The funds will be used to reimburse approved special educational programs in the district. The superintendent said Wayne Highlands' special education program is constantly evolving and looking to improve and keep up with mandates. He said special education is one of the most regulated programs in the state. He added, "I really can't get into specifics of what the claims are." The district did not identify the complainant other than to say it is a former student. It was unclear who represented the complainant in the matter. The case was handled by the Office for Dispute Resolution in Harrisburg. The office provides resources for parents and educational agencies to resolve disputes concerning the identification, evaluation, educational placement, or the provision of a free appropriate public education for students with disabilities, students who are gifted, and children with disabilities served by the early intervention system. The office helps to mediate cases in order to avoid the filing of lawsuits. Safety grants In other business, the Assistant Superintendent Timothy Morgan announced the district will receive about $40,000 to help with its school resource officer program. "It was a nice win for Wayne Highlands," Morgan said. The state Department of Education's Office for Safe Schools issued the grant to help fund the training and compensation of school resource officers and school police officers. The grant was allocated through a competitive review process. Western Wayne School District received a similar amount, $39,900, for the same purpose. District Superintendent Clay LaCoe said he was pleased by the windfall. "Writing (the grants) was worth every second," he said, noting how Assistant Superintendent Patrick Sheehan did a "great job" writing them. Both districts are each waiting to hear on $25,000 grants that would go toward security infrastructure upgrades.