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Wayne Independent - Honesdale, PA
  • Auditing report is examined

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  •  - During the monthly meeting of the Wayne County Conservation District, Brad Murray of CPA & Associates of Carbondale provided the board with the auditing report for 2012.
    The total fund balance as of Dec. 31, 2012 was $207,411. That is from dirt and gravel road, conservation and the clean water fund. There was also a breakdown of cash receipts, which totaled $247,198.
    While explaining what was included in the audit, Murray said he and his company had “no findings” that needed to be brought to the district's attention.
    “Everything is being handled appropriately,” he said. “This is a testimony to how the management is doing.”
    The report Murray had was only a draft and said that hard copies would be released with the final audit after it was approved by the board. After his presentation, the board accepted the draft.
    In other business:
    • The Dairy Princesses sent the board a card thanking them for their support.
    • It was reported that the state envirothon went well. A school from York County won the competition.
    • There have been reports of snakehead fish in Dyberry Creek, but Dave Kaneski, Waterways Conservation Officer (WCO) for the PA Fish and Boat Commission, said they are actually sea lamprey.
    “They have one duty,” he said. “They spawn and die.”
    These fish come from the ocean and spawn in fresh water.
    Kaneski said there will be a segment about the fish and Dyberry Creek on Outdoor Life on June 23 at 6:30 p.m. The show is on WNEP.
    • The conservation district wishes to warn the public about tics.
    “There are a lot of them out,” said Shane Kleiner, NERO CD field rep. “Lyme disease is one of the most misunderstood because it mimics a lot of things.”
    He said that sometimes you may think your pet has arthritis, but it can actually be lyme disease.
    • Heidi Ferber, nutrient management specialist, said she attended Kidz Safety Day on June 1 and said they “had good interactions” with those who attended.
    • Jamie Knecht, watershed specialist, said they received reimbursement of $1,867 for the Japanese Knotweed Demonstration Site from the Pennsylvania Conservation District (PACD) mini-grant.
    She said the grass they seeded at the site is “growing fairly well” and that some of the trees and shrubs that were planted “didn't react favorably” to a frost that occurred since they were planted, especially the tulip poplar.
    Knecht added that most of the plants are “doing well and continue to thrive.”
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