|
|
|
Wayne Independent - Honesdale, PA
Finding the sacred in everyday life
Day 23: When you want to make hope tangible
email print
About this blog
Marketta Gregory never meant to be a columnist. \x34I trained to be a newspaper reporter -- one who tried to her best to be objective. I covered religion for a few years and felt like it was the best job a curious woman like me could ever have. ...
X
Simply Faithful
Marketta Gregory never meant to be a columnist. \x34I trained to be a newspaper reporter -- one who tried to her best to be objective. I covered religion for a few years and felt like it was the best job a curious woman like me could ever have. Every day I got to listen as people told me about the things that were most important to them, the things that were sacred. But the newspaper industry was changing and few papers could afford to have an army of speciality reporters. So, I moved to cover the suburbs where, as luck would have it, they have plenty of religion, too. Eventually, children came into the picture. One by birth and another two months later by foster care/adoption. I struggled to chase breaking news and be home at a decent hour, so I made the move to what we journalists call the dark side: I took a job in public relations. (Don't worry. I work for a great non-profit, so it's not dark at all.) When I gave my notice at the Rochester (NY) Democrat and Chronicle, the executive editor asked me to consider writing a column on a freelance basis. She didn't want the newspaper to lose touch with its religious sources, and she still wanted consistent faith coverage. I was terrified. It took me about 10 months to get back to her with a solid plan and some sample columns. And so it began, this journey of opening up my heart to strangers.\x34
Recent Posts
Dec. 19, 2014 12:15 p.m.
Dec. 11, 2014 6:16 a.m.
Dec. 8, 2014 12:16 p.m.
Dec. 2, 2014 6:15 p.m.
Nov. 16, 2014 12:01 a.m.
By simplyfaithful
March 11, 2013 12:10 p.m.



watercolor cross1

I like how Ann Voskamp calls it a visible parable… how her mix of moss and dirt and stones tells the story of Jesus’ resurrection. I like how other writers — other people of faith — take sticks from the yard, fashion them into crosses and drape the purple of Lent around the middle cross to symbolize the one where our Jesus died.

The Internet is full of ideas for resurrection gardens, of Easter projects that ask us to make hope tangible.

watercolor cross3A few days ago my bunch sat around the kitchen table and made watercolor crosses. All of us, from 2 to 41, dipped the brush into water and then swirled the color. We used tape to map out the cross, and in the end, only the cross was left white. All that chaos of color and still there was Christ, there was hope.

I meant to turn our masterpieces into Easter cards, but now I’m not sure they will all be mailed away. We might need a few here, too. A few visible parables of our own.

watercolor cross2

Recent Posts

    latest blogs

    • Community
    • National