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Wayne Independent - Honesdale, PA
  • Left to Write: 200 years of Austen

  • I am the first to admit I am not a very romantic person. That being said, that isn't to imply I don't enjoy the idea and certain aspects of romance.
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  • I am the first to admit I am not a very romantic person. That being said, that isn't to imply I don't enjoy the idea and certain aspects of romance.
    It's just I don't find myself longing and becoming consumed with it like some seem to do.
    I don't particularly enjoy any romance novel, or anything written by Nicholas Sparks.
    I do, however, adore Jane Austen.
    This year marks the 200th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice and her invention of the swoon-worthy character of Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy.
    I love Mr. Darcy. I love all permutations of Mr. Darcy, be it in film or made for TV movie.
    I also love pretty much any adaption I can find of any of Austen's works, the most interesting being graphic novels, illustrated by Marvel, that bring the story of Darcy and Bennet into the modern world.
    Two-hundred years since publication, and Austen is still popular.
    And, not just kind of popular, but popular enough to have a cult following surrounding her. There are even special editions of knitting magazines revolving around Austen's fashion at the time.
    Pride and Prejudice continues to be made into films and mini-series, and was recently named the most popular book in Britain.
    It has even inspired hilarious and interesting parodies, with my favorite being one that casts Elizabeth Bennet as a zombie hunter. My second favorite is the murder mystery set six years since Darcy and Bennet married called "Death Comes to Pemberley."
    What never ceases to amaze me about any Austen novel is their ability to still remain relevant 200 years since first print in 1813. There are books that won't be relevant a week from today.
    There are the critics who continue to say that the novels of Austen are poorly written, or that certain characters are stereotypical.
    I challenge those critics to write a novel and see if it is beloved world wide in 200 years.
    Leet is a reporter for The Wayne Independent.
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