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Wayne Independent - Honesdale, PA
  • Seminar to take place Jan. 30

  • Peter Wulfhorst, of the Penn State Extension Office in Wayne County, attended the regular meeting of the commissioners to discuss an upcoming seminar.
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    - Peter Wulfhorst, of the Penn State Extension Office in Wayne County, attended the regular meeting of the commissioners to discuss an upcoming seminar.
    The workshop, called 'Toss Your Hat in the Ring,' is for "all those people who have ever thought about serving on their school board, borough council or township board," he said.
    Wulfhorst said the workshop is offered "every two years" to coincide with election terms.
    The program will provide information about Pennsylvania local government, the responsibilities of holding local positions, instructions on how to run among other things.
    A panel of local officials will also be present to answer questions and share their experiences about running.
    This is "the first time," the workshop is being offered in Wayne County Wulfhorst said. The previous time it was held in Monroe County.
    Commissioner Brian Smith said "it is a wonderful program" and a "perfect opportunity" for citizens to learn more about local government. Commissioner Wendell Kay added the program will help by adding to the "understanding of how the local government works" through education.
    The workshop will be held in the Penn State University Extension office in Honesdale on Jan. 30 from 7 to 9 p.m. The registration fee is $25. You can register for the course by visiting http://agsci.psu.edu/local-government/honesdale.
    The Children and Youth Services quarter one financial report was presented to the commissioners by Human Services Administrator Andrea Whyte.
    The report, with an ending date of Sept. 30, 2012, outlines the amount and type of funding the program receives. CYS currently received funding from state, federal and county levels.
    Whyte was happy to report the department received a $2.5 million grant to support its many services. The grant will be used "primarily in mental health" with some going "to Drug and Alcohol" and some "to Children and Youth Services and the Department of Aging."
    In applying for this grant, she said Wayne County " was one of 20 counties," eligible to participate in this grant, which will "replace the traditional funding mechanism" the departments once used. This will also help combat the 10 percent reduction in funding that recently faced the department.
    She said it is "more important than ever to work as efficiently as possible," and the receipt of this grant is evidence of this.
    Kay said in this situation "to our benefit, we've been at the forefront," of pursuing grant opportunities.
    Whyte said she is grateful to the commissioners "for having the courage to move forward" with the application.
    In keeping with being proactive, Wayne County also participated in a pilot program to develop computer software to help condense terminology used in the court system.
    Page 2 of 2 - The county received application of the PA CJ-UCMS Program Application and Memorandum of Understanding for new case management/offender software systems.
    The project, which the county joined at its inception two years ago, used the participation of the district attorney's office, the Wayne County Correctional Facility and the probation office.
    According to a release from the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania (CCAP), the project "will help to improve the quality of information." By increasing the quality of information, a study found "if Pennsylvania was able to reduce county prison population by making management decisions based on accurate and timely information, there would be substantial cost-savings for the counties."
    The program is now being expanded to 20 counties in the state from the original six participants. By participating in the pilot, Wayne County received a fee waiver of the installation cost totally $4,700.
    Other business:
    The resignation was accepted for Alfred G. Howell, Esq. from his post as a Public Defender, effective Jan. 15, 2013.
    Evelyn Jones, who has been with Children and Youth Services since 1985, submitted news of her retirement, effective April 2013. It was approved with best wishes and congratulations.
    Richard Henry, Esquire was hired to fill a vacancy in the public defenders office, effective Jan. 14.
    Chester Varner, Jr. was hired as a part-time van driver for Area Agency on Aging transportation, effective Jan. 14.

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