A new film seeking to debunk the controversial anti-fracking film “Gasland” is offering supporters who invest as little as $1 the opportunity to be named as an executive producer in the film’s credits.




A new film seeking to debunk the controversial anti-fracking film “Gasland” is offering supporters who invest as little as $1 the opportunity to be named as an executive producer in the film’s credits.

Parts of the film have been shot all over Marcellus Shale country, including such places as Hickory, McMurray, Dimock, Montrose, Hop Bottom, Springville, Damascus, Waymart, Williamsport, Scranton and Honesdale in Pennsylvania.

According to filmmaker Phelim McAleer, the film seeks to investigate what he says are misleading claims about the threats fracking poses and highlight the benefits the process can bring to the poorest communities across the country and the globe.

“FrackNation” investigates the health scares surrounding the fracking process, McAleer says, and reveals what he says is the startling lack of scientific evidence to substantiate them.

The filmmakers hope to raise at least $150,000 for the film through a grassroots campaign on the crowdfunding website kickstarter.com, which offers people an opportunity to support such projects with as little as a one dollar donation.

At the time of this writing, 1,912 people had chosen to back the film, pledging $133,179 of the $150,000 minimum goal. According to Kickstarter’s rules, they have 36 days left to meet their goal. The project will only be funded if at least $150,000 is pledged by Friday, Apr. 6. If not, the money pledged will be returned to the donors.

Having raised $50,000 in just the first week of fundraising and being within $20,000 of their goal, however, this looks unlikely.

“People have really put their money where their mouth is,” McAleer said referencing the broad-based support for the film. “The majority of backers have been from the U.S. and pledged between $20 and $35. Instead of going to the movies, they’re paying for one. We are so grateful for their contributions, especially when budgets are tight for everyone.”

“Normally, Kickstarter projects are pro-radical environmentalism,” said McAleer. "FrackNation is the first documentary funded through Kickstarter to challenge the environmental establishment.  It will appeal to the workers and small farmers who know the truth, but never see it represented in modern documentaries."

In a unique fundraising move, McAleer and his wife Ann McElhinney have decided that everyone who donates even a dollar to FrackNation will become an executive producer on the film. "This will be a documentary funded by the people for the people," said McAleer.

FrackNation comes on the heels of a new anti-fracking film is due to be released by activist filmmaker Josh Fox.  Fox made Gasland, an Oscar-nominated film, which propelled fears about fracking into the public arena. Fox is now planning a HBO-funded Gasland sequel. Fox has received $750,000 to make the new documentary.

"The Hollywood/environmental establishment has wheeled out big bucks to tell its story," said Ann McElhinney. "We’re just asking for $150,000. Ours will be a grassroots film telling real stories about real people across America and the world. The new Gasland will be funded and speak to the environmental elite – the 1 percent. FrackNation will be a film by the people for the people — it will give a voice to the 99 percent"

To learn more about FrackNation or to donate to the project, go to http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1009530098/fracknation.