It is common knowledge that mounting a write-in campaign is a difficult task.



Just ask Rich Hayes, of Pleasant Mount, who recently tried but failed to accumulate enough votes to get on the ballot as a Democrat in the 20th Senatorial District race.


It is common knowledge that mounting a write-in campaign is a difficult task.

Just ask Rich Hayes, of Pleasant Mount, who recently tried but failed to accumulate enough votes to get on the ballot as a Democrat in the 20th Senatorial District race.

“It was a challenge,” Hayes said. “I did all I could to get my name out there.”

The 20th Senatorial District, much like the 10th Congressional District, covers most of Northeast Pennsylvania, wrapping around Lackawanna County, and reaching to the western part of Luzerne County.

Hayes decided to jump into the race about a month before the primary election. It was too late for him to get his name on the ballot, but he felt compelled to run because he doesn't think anyone should run unopposed.

“I tried to give the people a choice, but now Lisa Baker has four more years of a free ride,” Hayes said.

Hayes needed 500 write-in votes to get his name on the ballot for the November general election.

After campaigning door-to-door and contacting Democratic County Committees in the  district, Hayes received a total of 342 votes.

He received 133 in Wayne County; 99 in Susquehanna County; 53 in Luzerne County; 46 in Pike County; 9 in Wyoming County; and 2 in Monroe County.

Hayes was going to push “issues that really hit home.”

Being a dairy farmer, Hayes planned to push for action on issues that affect the dairy industry. He also was going to push for a severance tax on Marcellus Shale.

Hayes' foray into politics is not over. “I want to stay active and do my part to make a difference in people's lives,” he said. “I intend on running again in a couple years with my name on the ballot.”

“I appreciate the support of everyone that supported me,” he said, “I'll be back.”