The low voter turnout in Tuesday’s primary election in Wayne County was consistent with the last gubernatorial primary election in 2006, with the total turnout percentage in the 20s, according to elections officials.


The low voter turnout in Tuesday’s primary election in Wayne County was consistent with the last gubernatorial primary election in 2006, with the total turnout percentage in the 20s, according to elections officials.
The Democratic turnout in Wayne County was at 24 percent for 2010. The 2006 turnout was 21.4 percent. The total number of Democratic voters who turned out on Tuesday was 2,523.
Republicans had slightly higher turnout than the Democrats in 2006 and 2010, but the party also had the advantage when it comes to registered voters in Wayne County.
Only 29 percent of Republicans turned out for the primary, which was down from the 2006 total of 30.4 percent.
The 2006 total turnout percentage for both political parties was higher, but barely.
Only 26.8 percent turned out this year, while in 2006, the total 27.4 percent.
There are 16,935 registered Republicans, and 10,639 registered Democrats for a total of 27,574 registered voters.
“I am not impressed in terms of turnout,” said Commissioner Brian Smith.
The low turnout number might have attributed to the low number of problem calls the voter registration office received.
“We had very few problems,” said Cindy Furman, director of the Wayne County Bureau of Elections. Most problems were handled by phone and dealt with confusion regarding registration, she said.
The Bureau of Elections is looking into polling locations across the county for any handicap accessibility issues. The bureau still has about $6,000 of a Helping Americans Vote Act (HAVA) grant used to upgrade polling place accessibility, Furman said.
The Board of Elections also reviewed five provisional ballots which were cast in the Tuesday’s primary.
Four of the five were rejected by the board, all due to registration errors.
The Board of Elections was particularly disheartened to throw out a provisional ballot of a first-time voter. Furman said the 18-year-old would-be voter was not in county or state records as a registered voter.
“We hate to discourage anyone from voting, but because of the circumstances, we have no choice but to disallow,” Smith said.
Other disallowed provisional ballots had problems such as voters who were not in the poll book as registered.
The one provisional ballot which was allowed was because of a mistake with an address change.
The Board of Elections is comprised of Commissioners Anthony Herzog and Brian Smith, as well as Commissioner Wendell Kay, who serves as chairman.
The official count begins today at 9 a.m.