Texas Township has tossed out the International Property Maintenance Code (IPMC) in favor of writing their own rules.

Supervisors say the IPMC, part of the state’s Uniform Construction Code, or UCC, is just too restrictive when it comes to property maintenance. For example, the IPMC says you can’t have a compost pile.


Texas Township has tossed out the International Property Maintenance Code (IPMC) in favor of writing their own rules.
Supervisors say the IPMC, part of the state’s Uniform Construction Code, or UCC, is just too restrictive when it comes to property maintenance. For example, the IPMC says you can’t have a compost pile.
“Lime that you spread on your lawn — mineral matter — not allowed,” said Texas Township resident John Bartron. “Anybody with a flower bed, the mulch has to go (according to the IPMC),” Bartron said.
Bartron was in favor of tossing the code book and writing their own ordinances.   
Supervisor Allan Wickle said the code book “just makes things too hard. The limitations are just out of bounds.”
Vice Chairman Don Doney said, “There’s definitions in there that describe grass clippings as rubbage and you have to dispose of them in a landfill.”
Saying Texas Township “opted in” back in 2004, Zoning Enforcement Officer Lee S. Krause said, “It looked good ...It was a package deal. You didn’t have to sit down with your engineer and your guy who helps you write your ordinances. You didn’t have to spend a lot of time and money on it ...It was attractive when you were adopting all of the other codes.”    
But things have changed. “Do I think every time they’ve updated that they’ve gotten ...more oppressive? I believe so. If you went verbatim with this book, there is absolutely nobody in Texas Township that would be able to pass. Everyone would be in violation. I think it’s become absurd,” Krause added.
Doney made a motion to rescind the IPMC, seconded by Wickle. The UCC, which governs electrical, plumbing, masonry and other codes involved in building a house, remains.