Stone Energy Company has a docket before the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) to withdraw to to 700,000 gallons of water a day for a total of 30 days from the West Branch of the Lackawaxen River in Mount Pleasant Township, to support the company’s existing gas well in adjacent Clinton Township.


Stone Energy Company has a docket before the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) to withdraw to to 700,000 gallons of water a day for a total of 30 days from the West Branch of the Lackawaxen River in Mount Pleasant Township, to support the company’s existing gas well in adjacent Clinton Township.
These activities support gas development and extraction activities targeting shale formations within the drainage area of Special Protection waters within the Delaware River Basin. This docket is the subject of a public hearing to be held at the Best Western in Matamoras this Wednesday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Katharine O’Hara, communications assistant for the DRBC, said the objective of the hearing is to give the public an opportunity to comment on Stone Energy Company’s current draft application. The public will not be able to vote on the matter, but the Commission will take into consideration the concerns from the public.
The DRBC asks that each member of the general public who wishes to speak arrive early to pre-register. The comment time allowed for each individual is 3 minutes, but if a person wishes to speak longer, the DRBC asks to submit the concern in writing.
65 tanker trucks a day
“The mode of delivery to the drilling site(s) has not yet been determined,” stated Tim O’Leary, spokesman for Stone Energy. “While pipeline delivery is being considered, truck delivery (approximately 65 truck trips per day, 4 to 5 days per month, for a few months per year) is also possible,” he stated.
 “The only viable technology for fracturing the shale requires the use of water,” O’Leary said.
A group calling themselves the “Delaware Riverkeeper Network” is concerned with the drilling, and specifically what the fracturing will do to the environment, comparing it to the anthracite mining done in the past.
“Pennsylvania is being threatened by another fossil fuel industry that wants to mine ancient, non-renewable reserves from the Earth--natural gas,” stated the group in a press release. “Hydraulic fracturing involves a dangerous cocktail of chemicals and sand and an enormous amount of water,” stated the group.
The group also stated concerns regarding the containment and disposal of the brine waste water. “Much of the Marcellus shale is beneath the cleanest and purest streams of the Delaware River. These tributary streams are the life force of the main stem Delaware and home to unique and diverse species that have become rare or are even non-existent from much of the watershed. These clean streams, surrounded by forests and natural areas, help cleanse the water that flows to the Delaware which serves as drinking water for 15 million people,” stated Tracy Carluccio, Deputy Director, Delaware Riverkeeper Network.
Marian Schweighofer, executive director of the Northern Wayne Property Owners Alliance (NWPOA), stated that their organization welcomes “responsible gas exploration,” and her organization is pleased that Stone Energy is interested in the area.
“We’re pleased that an operator in our area wants to collect additional data about the gas resource that may underlay all our lands,” she stated in a press release. “We will be watching closely the DRBC permitting process as it evolves, with anticipation that common sense will prevail and the assessment of our potential resource will go forward,” Schweighofer said.