The Friday before Memorial Day through Labor Day starts off the peak season for camping. With its the arrival of camping season, it is important for parents to be aware of potential dangers to avoid becoming a camping statistic.


The Friday before Memorial Day through Labor Day starts off the peak season for camping. With its the arrival of camping season, it is important for parents to be aware of potential dangers to avoid becoming a camping statistic.
Studies show that a little over 10,000 people each year are injured while camping. Camp fires are the cause of nearly 74% of children’s camping injuries; nearly 50% that have burns are under 4 years old. It is important to note that it takes 24 hours for fire coals of a fire to cool. Fire coals that are eight hours old have the potential to cause first degree burns. In fact, 70% of burn incidents occur this way.
Christopher R. Holtz, D.O., director of Pediatric Urgent Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre, offers suggestions for keeping your family safe:
• Explore the area in which you will be staying and identify landmarks along the way, in case a member of the group becomes lost.
• Remember to bring sealed food items, drinking water, insect repellant, waterproof matches, and a waterproof tent, extra clothing for potential climate changes), rain gear, pocket knife, compass, and folding saw.
• Always carry a first-aid kit. Remember to include bandages, gauze, burn cream, splinting material, and antiseptic.
• Pack sunscreen. While most camping areas are shaded, campgrounds often have swimming areas and clearings with sun exposure. A sunscreen with at least SPF 15 is best.
• Communication is very important. If a cell phone does not receive service, make sure to bring a two waytwo-way radio. If you are hiking, make sure a family member knows where you plan to hike and when you plan to return.
• Never let a children wander by themselves ; and remember not to leave them alone in a vehicle, tent , or camper.
• Do not drink water directly from its natural source without purification. If needed, Iiodine tablets are readily available at most grocery stores.
• Do not feed any of the wild animals, , no matter how harmless they seem.
• Remember to pitch a tent more than 10 feet away from a campfire.
“While camping brings a host of potential injuries to children and adults, most camping-related injuries are burns and bites,” according to Dr. Holtz. “Proper prevention is the best medicine to keep kids safe.”
Fire coals that are eight hours old still have the potential to cause first-degree burns. In fact, most burn incidents occur this way.