Dean Timothy O’Halloran is facing 15 months to five years in state prison following a two vehicle accident in 2005, where the other motorist, Diane Glynn, was killed.


[Editor's note: a previous report stating that this crash, involving Glynn,  was a hit and run, was incorrect. O'Halloran, according to police, had been in a hit and run accident that same morning prior to this crash in which Glynn was killed.]

Dean Timothy O’Halloran is facing 15 months to five years in state prison following a two vehicle accident in 2005, where the other motorist, Diane Glynn, was killed.

O’Halloran was driving a delivery truck along Route 590 near Hamlin, the morning of April 15, 2005, when he struck a car operated by Glynn, a single mother of three children. O’Halloran had been found to have had a blood alcohol content of .167 percent, which is over the legal limit.
Glynn died at the scene of the crash. She was 45.
O’Halloran, age 26, is from Scranton. He had pleaded guilty on March 16, 2009 to Involuntary Manslaughter and to DUI, both rated as first degree misdemeanors.
The attorney for the victim’s family, attorney Mark W. Tanner, remained adamant following the sentencing in Wayne County Court, Thursday, that the Pa. State Police have an obligation to provide answers to the tardy process of finding justice.
He has been critical of the fact that O’Halloran, the stepson of a Pennsylvania State Trooper, had avoided prosecution for four years. Last year after the conclusion of a civil suit, Tanner turned over evidence to the Wayne County District Attorney’s office that O’Halloran had been driving intoxicated. State Police then reopened the investigation and charged O’Halloran with homicide by vehicle and other charges.
The lawyer asked how it could be O’Halloran “walks away for years without even a traffic ticket.” Tanner asked how likely it would be if anyone else could get away with that. He stated he had approached State Police and was invited to ask questions, but has never received any answers.
“There is no law suit I can file to make the State Police come forward,” he told the press. “Only their conscience and the scrutiny the media provides.”
Tanner expressed hope the State Police would be more forthcoming, now that the criminal investigation is over.
He commented that the defendant has not learned responsibility and only acknowledged what he had done when he was exposed. Tanner said he was satisfied with the Court’s ruling.
O’Halloran was also ordered to pay all Court costs, undergo a drug and alcohol evaluation together with a mental health evaluation, pay a fine of $1,500.00 and attend and complete an alcohol highway safety program.
D.A. Michael Lehutsky had earlier stated there had not been probable cause at the time of the initial investigation to charge O’Halloran with DUI. He also stated that he saw no proof that the investigation was tainted by undue influence because of the defendant’s stepfather. The D.A. was not available for comment Thursday.