Until Sunday, I hadn’t hiked in Jenny Jump State Forest for more than a year. It’s near Blairstown, in Warren County, New Jersey, and next door to Hope, a restored Moravian settlement that’s also worth a visit.


Until Sunday, I hadn’t hiked in Jenny Jump State Forest for more than a year. It’s near Blairstown, in Warren County, New Jersey, and next door to Hope, a restored Moravian settlement that’s also worth a visit.
Jenny Jump Mountain is a clone of granite formations that shape the Adirondacks, the granites of both places dated at 1.2 billion years B.C.            
A hald mile climb to the summit opens vistas of a former glacial lake, in the south, and of Kittatinny Mountain and the Delaware Water Gap to the north.
The last (Wisconsin) glacier, which polished rocks near the trail, also cut grooves in them, aligned from north to south – perhaps using cobbles plucked from the Water Gap area.
I always feel at home when hiking to the summit and greeting familiar friends – from stargrass and corydalis flowers that blossom in May, to a stunted pignut hickory I enjoy photographing.
Sunday, as the day waned, I heard the jumble of a familiar song I couldn’t trace, until I saw a bird perched on the highest twig of a dead limb – a sparrow sized Indigo Bunting, singing its heart out.
It’s an image I’ll carry for months – the bird’s iridescent blue, poised at the top of things, with just rock and sky to listen.