Stacey Theobald of Creamton lives her life teaching others what she’s learned.


Stacey Theobald of Creamton lives her life teaching others what she’s learned.


“You learn to teach,” says the 17-year-old Western Wayne Senior. When it came time to choose her senior project, she knew it would revolve around her family’s farm and 4-H. Tuesday found the entire RD Wilson second grade class enjoying a day at Riverside Farm in Creamton.


Stacey says she came up with the theme “Agriculture is a big word” when she went to a Jersey cattle convention. “I figured since agriculture and 4-H has opened up so many doors for me, I wanted to give something back, give them the same opportunities,” she said. As part of their four-hour outing, the kids toured the farm, had a hayride, planted a tree, and played a number of field games. Part of the fun involved the 4-H pledge: “I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to great loyalty, my hands to larger service, and my health to better living for my club, my community, my country and my world.” 


Stacey has been involved in the Creamton Area Ag 4-H Club since the age of eight. “Next year’s my last year,” she says regretfully.


Wayne County 4-H Coordinator Kim Mikulak was on hand to talk to the kids, along with volunteers: Colleen Richner, Linda Pazel, Stephanie Kilgallon and Stacey’s brother, Andy and sister, Becky (Wayne County Dairy Ambassador).


Stacey is a member of County Council, the National Honor Society, and Wildcats Volley Ball Team for the past four years. 


The daughter of Charles and Amy Theobald, Stacey plans to pursue a degree in Food and Ag Science, and work at the creamery’s test lab.