Sirens wailing and lights flashing, six state police cars made their way through downtown Honesdale Tuesday afternoon, responding to what was thought to be an attempted kidnapping in progress in Honesdale. It turned out to be a misunderstanding involving child custody.


 Sirens wailing and lights flashing, six state police cars made their way through downtown Honesdale Tuesday afternoon, responding to what was thought to be an attempted kidnapping in progress in Honesdale. It turned out to be a misunderstanding involving child custody.
Corporal Robert P. Avvisato, Patrol Supervisor for the Honesdale Barracks says the baby’s grandmother called police after overhearing a phone call the father made, that she mistook to mean he was going to take the child and not return. It was later found that the man was on the phone with his lawyer talking about something else.
Joel Lavine of Honesdale called The Wayne Independent Wednesday to find out what had happened. Lavine was walking his dog on the lower end of Main Street, near the State Liquor Store, when he saw the cops go flying by. “It was unbelievable, like something out of one of those TV shows ...It could have been right out of a Steven Seagal set,” he said. “If you told me someone could travel 50 mph down Main Street, midday, I would have told them they were crazy,” he said, with the pedestrian traffic and cars turning onto side streets. After hearing what had happened, Lavine said, “That was a pretty dramatic call they were responding to. I appreciate the concern they have for the community, but they could have put people’s lives in jeopardy,” he said. “It bothered me enough to call you people up.” Lavine figures they were going 45 to 50 mph. in the 25 mph zone. He wondered why they didn’t use Church Street or split their approach between Main and Church streets.
“As police, we would never jeopardize a citizen’s safety,” said Corporal Avvisato. But a Code 3,  kidnapping in progress, means time is of the essence. “Once that’s broadcast throughout the station, all available cars respond before the person can get away,” he said. “We use our lights and siren for emergencies that need to be responded to quickly,” he said, alerting the public to, “yield the way so we can do our job efficiently and effectively. We try to drive safely, but we need to respond to the scene as quickly as we can.”  
“We don’t want the public to think we’d endanger them. That’s not what we’re here for,” Corporal Avvisato said. The Corporal said he was not on this particular call.
State Police were covering for Honesdale Borough Police while they were on training.