Wayne County Commissioners Brian Smith, Anthony Herzog and Wendell Kay were the guests Tuesday of the Wayne County Chamber of Commerce at a special breakfast in their honor. Cordaro’s Restaurant banquet room was nearly  filled, where after a buffet of eggs, pancakes and all the trimmings, they heard about ddtheir county government.


Wayne County Commissioners Brian Smith, Anthony Herzog and Wendell Kay were the guests Tuesday of the Wayne County Chamber of Commerce at a special breakfast in their honor. Cordaro’s Restaurant banquet room was nearly  filled, where after a buffet of eggs, pancakes and all the trimmings, they heard about ddtheir county government.
Chairman Brian Smith, a Wayne County dairyman, is serving his first year on the Board. He emphasized keeping communication lines open and pledged, “We will return your phone calls.” Commissioner meetings, he noted, are held on Tuesday and Thursday at 10:30 a.m. at the Courthouse.
Balancing need for services and affordable tax levels is the job of the Commissioners, he noted. Unlike in prior generations, today the economic “comfort zone” for the average family is disappearing, he stated; as this happens, more and more people are concerned that their tax dollars are spent wisely.
Commissioner Anthony Herzog was reelected to a new term last November. A previous member of the Chamber Board, he lauded the Chamber’s efforts at keeping the Stourbridge Line train excursions operating.
“Wayne County is open for business,” Herzog stressed, and the County remains supportive of all three area chamber of commerce organizations. The County also stand behind agricultural interests and through WEDCO, is looking out for creation of good jobs. The businesses represented in the room, he noted, are the ones employing the people and turning the tax dollars over.
Commissioner Wendell Kay, who also just began his first year, explained the story of the electronic voting machines and how the County decided to switch back to paper ballots, in advance of the April 22nd Primary. The state had decertified the electronic machines last October, after being in use here for less than two years. Although the machines cost the County approximately $293,000, the state is reimbursing that, which is paying for most of the cost of optical scanner devices which will scan the paper ballots at the courthouse. That left the County about $11,000 short, but the County has since been able to rent the electronic machines to another organization, for $9,000. The County chose not to return to the electronic machines due to litigation before the Commonwealth Court concerning their reliability.
The upcoming election, said Kay, is proving most interesting, with as of last Friday, about 600 Wayne County Republicans have switched to the Democratic Party. The final day to switch parties or register to vote was on Monday March 24. Kay is chairing the Wayne County Board of Elections.